Plans to restore historic fire-ravaged Glasgow Golf Club at Bearsden

Fighter-fighters attend a major fire at Glasgow Golf Club, one of the oldest and most prestigious in the world, which has gutted most of the building. September 21, 2018.
Fighter-fighters attend a major fire at Glasgow Golf Club, one of the oldest and most prestigious in the world, which has gutted most of the building. September 21, 2018.

One of the world’s oldest golf clubs is seeking permission to restore its historic clubhouse which was severely damaged by fire last year.

Glasgow Golf Club in Bearsden has applied to East Dunbartonshire Council for permission to proceed with the restoration project at B-listed Georgian building  Killermont House, which was the scene of a major blaze in September 2018.

The club is proposing a new three-storey extension housing an entrance hall, offices, toilets, plant rooms, storage and fire escape stair, along with a new terrace on the southern elevation as well as a new courtyard and extended car parking faciliities. 

In a statement the club says: ” The stated aim of the club is to reinstate the existing building to respect the heritage of the Grade B listed building, to ensure compliance with current building standards and to take account of

members ambitions to improve facilities available in the existing building wherever possible.”

The fire is believed to have resulted from faulty kitchen equipment. The damage sustained was extensive and only portions of the building survived.

Although the mansion’s interiors have been destroyed, a significant amount of the external stonework remains intact, so the proposals are mainly to restore the building’s external appearance to its pre-fire condition.

Inside the building, it is proposed to recreate the original room layout as it was before the fire.

Killermont House is on the former Killermont Estate, which was  inherited by Archibald Campbell Colquhoun in 1804, and the south wing was built the following year.

In 1904,  Glasgow Golf Club established its clubhouse at the House and undertook a number of minor alterations. Further modifications carried out in 1932 have now been destroyed by the fire.