World champion Katie still getting used to some wear over rainbow

British Cycling, in partnership with UK Sport and Manchester City Council, can today confirm that Manchesters HSBC UK National Cycling Centre will host a round of the 2017-18 Tissot UCI Track Cycling World Cup later this year. The National Lottery-funded event will take place from 10-12 November at the home of British Cycling and the Great Britain Cycling Team, with the worlds premier track cycling series returning to Manchester for the first time since 2013. �Sportsbeat/Roberto Payne all rights reserved, no use without prior permission, please contact picturedesk@sportsbeat.co.uk for more information
British Cycling, in partnership with UK Sport and Manchester City Council, can today confirm that Manchesters HSBC UK National Cycling Centre will host a round of the 2017-18 Tissot UCI Track Cycling World Cup later this year. The National Lottery-funded event will take place from 10-12 November at the home of British Cycling and the Great Britain Cycling Team, with the worlds premier track cycling series returning to Manchester for the first time since 2013. �Sportsbeat/Roberto Payne all rights reserved, no use without prior permission, please contact picturedesk@sportsbeat.co.uk for more information

Five months have passed since she could don the rainbow stripes but, for Katie Archibald, the pressure of being individual world champion is not set to disappear any time soon.

The Milngavie rider took top spot in the omnium at the 2017 UCI Track Cycling World Championships in Hong Kong in April, a prize that brought with it a whole new rainbow-coloured outfit come any future race day.

Add that to her Rio 2016 Olympic gold medal, eight European titles and team pursuit world crown from three years ago, and Archibald has become very used to success.

But the 23-year-old admits the nerves still hit each and every time she takes to the bike, with the weight of expectation firmly on her shoulders, whether on the track or the road.

“Wearing those rainbow bands is scary – by its nature, everyone is watching you and I suppose that’s the idea, but it doesn’t make it easier,” she said.

“You feel that pride when you look in the mirror, but that fear kicks in when you hit the boards, you want to be able to do it justice.

“It’s not just a rainbow jersey, you’re also wearing the Great Britain jersey – we’re known for the depth that we have in our women’s endurance team and the entire squad, and it proves you’re deserving of wearing that.

“Even though I’m world champion, there is a lot of contention for that omnium spot so there is pressure in that.

“Both on the track and the road, it’s apparent that the support you get from the UK is massive and that’s what overseas riders are able to notice about us.”

Archibald’s bid to show off the stripes will continue in November, taking to the velodrome in Manchester for the TISSOT UCI Track Cycling World Cup – a competition that will see her career go full circle.

The Scottish star took the world by storm when still in cycling infancy in 2013, securing scratch race silver and individual pursuit bronze in a performance showing exactly what she was capable of in years to come.

But a return to Manchester provides plenty of opportunity to reflect, with the journey from then to now – highlighted by an Olympic gold medal – one she herself struggled to expect.

“My first Track World Cup did come in Manchester back in 2013, so it feels very special to have a crack again at that excitement,” she said.

“I was there as the only person riding for Scotland and I felt like a little bit of an intruder.”

Continued on page 39

, but left with a bronze and a silver medal and was flabbergasted.

“Glasgow is my home track but I’ve been based in Manchester for a while now and it has very much felt like a second home for me, it feels very special to be able to bring your friends, bring your family down to watch what you do best.

“When it’s a home track like this, you really own the competition, it adds a lot of pressure but there is also a massive privilege that comes with it.

“There is a lot of good history in Manchester, most of the greats of British cycling have ridden around that track and people come to know through events like the Track World Cup.”

On November 10-12, incredible riders like Katie Archibald will compete on the Manchester Velodrome in one of the most anticipated events on the track cycling calendar. Buy your tickets http://www.trackworldcup.co.uk/tickets/