Getting rid of those chicken wings

31-01-2015 Picture Roberto Cavieres. David Pirie golf column pictures. World of Golf,2700 Great Western Road, Clydebank

31-01-2015 Picture Roberto Cavieres. David Pirie golf column pictures. World of Golf,2700 Great Western Road, Clydebank

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There is no doubt that all golfers have heard of the phrase chicken wing, but what is is and much more importantly, how do we cure it?

Take a look at the first picture and I will explain all. It occurs right at the point of impact, where you least want it to and simply it is when the left arm bends up to resemble a chickens wing.

31-01-2015 Picture Roberto Cavieres. David Pirie golf column pictures. World of Golf,2700 Great Western Road, Clydebank

31-01-2015 Picture Roberto Cavieres. David Pirie golf column pictures. World of Golf,2700 Great Western Road, Clydebank

As it happens at the moment of impact a poor shot is the normal result. The department that it affects most is the fairway woods/rescue clubs, when the ball is not teed up.

You will clearly see that I have placed the Martin Kaymer tennis ball around my neck, allowing the ball to nestle comfortably between my forearms. We are actually using a slightly larger, softer ball, as it doesn’t require to be squeezed to remain in position.

Now have a look at the second picture. This time without using a club at all I have swung through until my hands have reached roughly the eight o’clock position. At this point note how my left arm is still nice and straight, with the yellow ball still firmly in place.

If I had chicken winged it, the yellow ball would have instantly dropped out. After only a few swings like this, I will make some with my seven iron, then start hitting some small punchy shots, focusing on retaining the yellow ball at the end of the short swing.

When you can do this consistently, you will no longer have any unwanted chicken wing! As I said earlier, it really shows up on fairway wood shots as the club rises up as it strikes the ball, resulting in low, or topped shots.

Normally however when this happens the player is told to keep their head down, as if that is going to make any difference to a chicken winger. This common fault affects golfers of all levels and is perhaps most prevalent in the Womens game.

So there we are, if you are troubled by this fault you now have more idea just how to cure it. Good luck as always. Next week: Trackman time.