Don’t throw in the towel over your golf swing!

Pirie World of Golf. Clydebank.
Pirie World of Golf. Clydebank.

Cast your mind back to the mid-eighties, when Nick Faldo was working with David Leadbetter to re-build his swing.

One of their most commonly used drills was the towel drill, and here we are some thirty years later, still talking about the same drill.

Pirie World of Golf. Clydebank.

Pirie World of Golf. Clydebank.

Take a look at the first picture and you will see that I have placed a large rolled up towel under my arms. I have then proceeded to make a half swing, making sure that the towel stays firmly in place.

When the arms and body are not working in sync/harmony, the towel will drop to the ground. The term for keeping it all together is being connected. When your swing becomes disconnected, that is when you start hitting the ball all over the place, as the line back down to the ball varies considerably.

Now have a glance at the second picture. This time I have struck the ball, yet my hands have finished at the three o’clock position with the towel still firmly held in place. At this point my entire body is facing towards the target, my weight is now fully on my left side, with my head/eyes up following the flight of the ball.

This type of action used to be referred to as a body release - the unwinding motion through the impact area, allowed the club face to naturally square up. This is a good consistent way to play golf, rather than being a handsy, wristy, flicky, type of player, which is a very inconsistent way to play. Most of the top players in today’s modern game have very passive hands through impact. One of the main reasons why they are the top players is that they are so steady and reliable.

Which category do you fit into? If you are not very consistent try this simple towel drill out with a few half swings. You will very quickly begin to hit the ball better and much more accurately. Give it a try, you just might like it! Next week: Putting tips