Pupils’ explosive show as Big Bang hits stage

St Andrew's Pr Bearsden,'Pupils doing Scottish Opera workshop with pupils from Castlehill Primary.'Einstein Alan McKenzie, Mother Earth Michele Gallager and Lord Kelvin Steven Ritchie with Millie Girvan, Erin Bissett, Lucy Goodwin, Alana Heatherington, Jack Burrows and Thomas Sedgwick From Castlehill, ( Not Left to Right , 11 pupils from Castlehill the rest from Bearsden Pr)'Photo by Paul Mc Sherry 16th Feb 2012.
St Andrew's Pr Bearsden,'Pupils doing Scottish Opera workshop with pupils from Castlehill Primary.'Einstein Alan McKenzie, Mother Earth Michele Gallager and Lord Kelvin Steven Ritchie with Millie Girvan, Erin Bissett, Lucy Goodwin, Alana Heatherington, Jack Burrows and Thomas Sedgwick From Castlehill, ( Not Left to Right , 11 pupils from Castlehill the rest from Bearsden Pr)'Photo by Paul Mc Sherry 16th Feb 2012.

SCIENCE was brought out of the lab and on to the stage when pupils from St Andrew’s Primary School and Castlehill Primary in Bearsden joined forces to take part in an environmental themed workshop run by Scottish Opera.

The P6 and P7 children were part of a bigger chain reaction of creativity in classrooms across the country when they performed the Big Bang Show which explores issues around power and energy.

After nearly five weeks of learning songs such as ‘Fission Chips’ and ‘Dig It’ the pupils spent last Thursday with a team of arts education specialists and performers to prepare them for a 30-minute opera performance at St Andrew’s Primary for friends, family and classmates.

Headteacher of St Andrew’s, Jim Kerr, said: “It was an absolutely fantastic experience for the children and it was good to work in partnership with Castlehill Primary.

“This workshop gives pupils the opportunity to really shine and come out of their shell.

“It’s a great way to help build their confidence, especially those who are a bit shy, they really enjoy it.”

Scottish Opera director of education Jane Davidson, said: “The Big Bang Show not only introduces the children to opera and helps them develop their creativity, it works in line with the Curriculum for Excellence to enhance what they’re already being taught in their classrooms. You can see the children really enjoy learning and performing the opera and it gets a great reaction from pupils, teachers and parents alike.”

The Big Bang Show’s characters - Einstein, Gaia (Mother Earth) and Lord Kelvin - take the performers on a whistle-stop tour of the creation of the universe and explore where energy comes from, how we get it and use it and what effect it has on us all.

Three groups represent the different types of energy - wind, water and sun, fossil fuels and nuclear power. Each led by their own champions, they debate which is best, until Mother Earth points out that unless humans begin to take real reponsibilty for their use of fossil and nuclear powers, the Earth will die. She urges them to learn the lessons of natural powers while there is still time.

Seven thousand pupils across Scotland are taking part in the the Big Bang Show between January and June this year.