Making the connection that matters

07-04-2015 Picture Roberto Cavieres. David Pirie at World of Golf
07-04-2015 Picture Roberto Cavieres. David Pirie at World of Golf

When I meet a new pupil I often ask them what they are hoping to achieve from their golf lesson and the answer is usually they want to be more consistent.

They tend to have some very good rounds, then the next time out it is as if they have never played before! If this sounds familiar then read on. In the first picture I am using one of the best training aids, for creating a more consistent, more reliable swing. This golf ball connection was invented by the German player Martin Kaymer, about a year ago and he reckoned it helped him to win his second major, the US Open. Martin was struggling with his initial moveaway from the ball. His forearms were slightly separating causing the club to travel on a flat rounded path too far behind him.

07-04-2015 Picture Roberto Cavieres. David Pirie at World of Golf

07-04-2015 Picture Roberto Cavieres. David Pirie at World of Golf

As you will clearly see my forearms have stayed together as the yellow ball remains in place, just before the halfway point of the backswing. This creates a sensation of feeling connected and the ultimate feeling of a one piece takeaway where everything works in harmony.

Now have a look at the second picture. This time I am almost at the point of impact with the yellow ball still firmly in place. This helps greatly to keep both arms straight and cures any unwanted chicken wing, and almost forces the club face to remain very square through impact. So all in all you are achieving the ultimate connection through the impact zone by simply keeping the yellow ball between your forearms.

This is also a great training aid for chipping, pitching, and putting. If you are a handsy, flicky, wristy, type of player then you simply must try out this simple drill. When you do, you will instantly feel the difference. One of the main reasons for golfers being inconsistent is the fact that they suffer from a disconnected swing, where the club travels back to the ball on a different route every time.

Not hard to see then just why they have good days and bad days. Good luck trying to be more connected. Next week: Flop shot.