KENNY MAC ON SONG FOR BEATSON PEBBLE APPEAL

Guardian Angel

Guardian Angel

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A GLASGOW shipbuilder turned songwriter has released a single to help raise money for a cancer research centre in Bearsden.

The song Guardian Angel, produced and performed by Kenneth McIlvenny from Glasgow, is available for download from Amazon and iTunes for 89 pence.

All proceeds from download sales will be donated to the Beatson Pebble Appeal which is raising £10million to fund the construction of the Beatson Translational Research Centre, a state-of-the-art cancer research facility based in Garscube Estate, Bearsden.

Kenneth (49), who records under the name Kenny Mac, wrote the song for his cousin Irene, who is currently being treated for cancer at the Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre.

He said: “I’ve been writing and recording songs for quite a while now but this is the first time I’ve made one available to the public. If the single does well I’d be keen to release a full album of my tracks in support of the Beatson Pebble Appeal.

Support

“The song is about how people can support each other through times of crisis, and how everyone has someone to look out for them.

“I was inspired to write it after reading about the Beatson Pebble Appeal and thinking about the ripples created by dropping pebbles into water. I hope releasing the song creates some ripples which will help the appeal.

“My father died from cancer, and my cousin is currently undergoing treatment for it. It’s a terrible disease but the support available to patients at the Beatson and the research being done into new treatments is world-class. I’m proud to be doing my bit to help raise money for such a worthy cause.”

The Translational Research Centre is a collaboration between the University of Glasgow, the Beatson Institute, Cancer Research UK and NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. It will help scientists translate their research in the laboratory into real therapies for cancer patients so that hospital treatments are steered by the most up to date science.

Barry Gusterson, of the University of Glasgow, said: “Our vision is to be in a position to treat patients in a more tailored way, with customised drugs, targeted treatments and diagnostic options that are less toxic and more effective, so that each cancer and each patient is treated individually.

“Fundraisers like Kenneth play an invaluable role in helping us to realise our goals and provide real benefits for cancer sufferers. We’re grateful he has chosen to support the Beatson Pebble Appeal with his music.”

For more information on the Beatson Pebble Appeal, visit www.beatsonpebbleappeal.org