Cycle slog that’s set to be a day to remember

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Cyclists across Scotland are getting into gear for the Edinburgh to St Andrews Cycle Ride on June 17 – one of Scotland’s oldest cycling events.

It starts at the West Gate of Edinburgh’s Inverleith Park at 8.45am before setting of on a unique 68-mile route,

Cycllists then cross the Forth Road Bridge and pass through the Fife Hills before finishing in St Andrews – perhaps with a stop for ice cream or fish and chips on the way to the finish line.

The Edinburgh to St Andrews cycle ride has taken place since the late 70’s and the event is now in its 38th year.

It is suitable for all ages and cycling abilities, and over the years it’s estimated more than 14,000 riders have taken part – often returning year upon year.

Shane Voss, who has cycled in all but two rides since 1986, said: “I love the spirit of the ride.

“Even when the weather isn’t at its best, people are generally cheery.

“Spending the day cycling and always being in sight of other cyclists is one of the things I enjoy most.

“The lunch and afternoon tea stops are always full, with a fantastic spread provided by the local organisations.”

The funds raised from the event go to the UK-based, international charity Lepra, whichworks to beat leprosy in India, Bangladesh and Mozambique.

The charity carries out life-changing work to provide vital treatment to cure people affected by the disease. Over the years, the cycle ride has raised almost £500,000 to help those in need.

Ross Kerry, Community Fundraising Manager for Lepra, said: “Leprosy is most prevalent in extremely poor countries, where people are often unable seek the medical treatment they so desperately need.

“The funds raised from this event really do make such a difference – as it enables our teams to treat as many children, women and men as possible.

Visit lepra.org.uk/Event/edinburgh-to-st-andrews-cycle-ride to reserve a space for this year’s cycle ride.

Registration for the trip will begin at 8am in Edinburgh’s Inverleith Park.