Bearsden’s premier family of art is celebrated at Lillie

Lily Art Gallery- Exhibition Opening'L/R: David Robson, Joan Hughson, Mark O'Neill, Peter Robson and Gallery Curator Hildegarde Berwick'15th January 2011'Pic: Roberto Cavieres
Lily Art Gallery- Exhibition Opening'L/R: David Robson, Joan Hughson, Mark O'Neill, Peter Robson and Gallery Curator Hildegarde Berwick'15th January 2011'Pic: Roberto Cavieres

A NEW exhibition at The Lillie Art Gallery in Milngavie ‘At Home in Bearsden and Corrie’ shows work by the Sandeman family who lived in one of the oldest houses in Bearsden for 74 years.

Margot Sandeman was raised in Lochend Farmhouse by her mother Muriel Boyd and her father Archibald Sandeman, who moved there in 1918.

Her mother was an award winning embroiderer who had studied at Glasgow School of Art.

Margot grew up surrounded by paintings, watercolours, drawings and embroideries and followed in her mother’s footsteps, studying painting at Glasgow School of Art in the early 1940s.

The exhibition has been curated by Joan Hughson of the Hughson Gallery and the Lillie Art Gallery, and is the first to explore the work of all three members of the Sandeman family.

It spans a time period of 100 years, from early embroideries by Muriel Boyd, to paintings by Margot in the first decade of the 21st century.

Works by Margot’s father, whose occupation was in the oil and varnish business, include watercolour paintings of the Scottish landscape, particularly the islands of Arran and Skye. In his spare time he became a member of Glasgow Art Club.

The views of the island of Arran in the exhibition - in watercolour, pencil or embroidery - illustrate the significance of the island’s landscape for the Sandeman family. Arran remained central to Margot’s inspiration throughout her lifetime.

She had first visited as a child with her parents and continued to to go there regularly.

Joan Eardley, a fellow Glasgow School of Art student who also lived in Bearsden, accompanied the family to the island in the early 1940s.

A local resident of Corrie, where the family stayed in Arran, was Jeannie Kelso. A pastel drawing by Joan Eardley records Jeannie’s portrait and this work can be seen in the exhibition. Another friendship which Margot retained from her student years at Glasgow School of Art, was with Ian Hamilton Finlay.

During the 1980s, Margot produced oil paintings which married together her rhythmical sense of line and colour with short verses of poetry selected by him.

The exhibition is accompanied by a 40 page full colour publication and runs until March 16.