A poignant tribute to Moir

Tree Planting in memory of Moir Garrett, by Former Archbishop of Canterbury Lord George Carey and his wife Lady Eileen with Moir's partner Jean Moughn organising.'Lord Carey say's a prayer for Moir.
Tree Planting in memory of Moir Garrett, by Former Archbishop of Canterbury Lord George Carey and his wife Lady Eileen with Moir's partner Jean Moughn organising.'Lord Carey say's a prayer for Moir.

The former Archbishop of Canterbury’s wife has helped plant an oak tree in memory of much loved Milngavie man Moir Garrett.

Following Moir’s death in February last year at the age of 86, it was decided a lasting memorial should be put in place to a man who was such a large part of the Milngavie community.

And last Thursday friends and family gathered just off Mugdock Road on Barloch Moor for a short ceremony and plaque unvailing which included Lord George Carey and his wife who was Moir’s cousin Lady Eileen Carey.

Lady Carey helped to plant the tree, which is 18 feet high.

Moir’s long term partner for more than 20 years, Jean Maughan, said: “It was a lovely uplifting ceremony and a real celebration of his life. It is fitting that the tree is almost opposite where he used to live.”

Ms Maughan added: “He was a remarkable man and touched so many peoples lives with his kindness and willingness to help those who needed it. In 2007, at the age of 81, he walked the West Highland Way and helped raise £8,000 for Cancer Research.”

Moir died in St Margaret’s Hospice of throat cancer and although his stay was brief, having been admitted only the day before, he was already well known there.

For years he was a regular bearer of friendship and solace to countless patients at St Margaret’s - just one of the factors which led to him being awarded with an MBE in 2007 for services to the community of Milngavie and the surrounding district.

Despite the time he dedicated to the sick, at his own end of his life he gave strict instructions to Jean, to tell no one that his time was so close.

Thinking of others to the end, he said people had better things to do than sit by his bedside.

Moir was a hero to many and was regularly seen around Milngavie dog walking for those too ill to get out.

He also distinguished himself in the Second World War. As a radio operator in the merchant navy he was awarded the Arctic Emblem to veterans of convoys that delivered vital supplies to Russia.

It was described at the time by Winston Churchill as the worst journey in the world with a very high casualty rate among the seamen.